Climate change could increase flooding from hurricanes for hospitals in highly populated areas along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, according to a study reported yesterday in GeoHealth. The authors estimate at least half of hospitals in 25 metropolitan areas on these coasts are at risk of flooding from relatively weak hurricanes, and that expected sea level rise this century could increase the odds of flooding by 22%. 
 
“The prospect of more probable and severe hurricane strikes in regions lesser experience[d] with hurricanes, such as the Northeast, underscores the importance of sharing best practices and standardized approaches to hurricane preparedness and response,” the authors wrote. “Annual hospital vulnerability analyses required by the Joint Commission afford one means to do so.”

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